Motivation Reply

How does a business benefit from having a well-motivated workforce?
As we all know, a well-motivated workforce can provide the following advantages:

Increased productivity
Lower levels of absenteeism
Lower levels of turnover
Lower training and recruitment costs


But what is it that encourages or motivates workers to go beyond the confines of their role and job description? What factors make staff go the “extra mile”?

Having “engaged employees” is potentially a source of competitive advantage and can also be invaluable when a business is going through a process of change.

By definition, motivating factors vary from firm to firm and across different industries. Employees in service businesses have different opportunities to attend to customer needs than those operating in the primary or secondary sectors. The organizational structures and cultures of businesses also vary widely.

The role of business leadership is also identified as a strong motivator, which is pretty unsurprising but still important. Good leadership instills a sense of mission & purpose in employees. An employee is unlikely to go the extra mile for a boss who they don’t trust or respect.

Employees who look at their jobs as a service to others, or as serving their boss according to Wharton management professor Adam Grant are the most satisfied with their job roles. Grant has devoted significant chunks of his professional career to examining what motivates workers in settings that range from call centers and mail-order pharmacies to swimming pool lifeguard squads. In all these situations, Grant says, employees who know how their work has a meaningful, positive impact on others are not just happier than those who don’t; they are vastly more productive, too.

Grant also suggests that “task significance” is a key driver, and that face-to-face interactions, even seemingly superficial ones, can serve as a way of driving that significance home. In other studies he has found that engineers, salespeople, managers, customer service representatives, doctors, nurses, medical technicians, security guards, police officers and firefighters who can directly see their impact on others all achieve higher job performance.

Motivation has been studied for decades and leaders in the workplace have used assessments like Myers-Briggs to determine their employee’s personality types to better anticipate behaviors and tendencies. Additionally, motivational books are used as tools to get employees to increase their performance and / or get them back on track. While assessments, books and other tools can help project and inspire short and long performance, the factors that motivate employees to achieve evolve as they mature and begin to truly understand what matters most to them. Therefore, as leaders we must hold ourselves accountable to build meaningful and purposeful relationships that matter with our employees. This allows us to better understand those we are serving, just as much as ourselves.

As a leader, we need to not just read the assessment scores, we should get to know those whom we are leading and be specific about how we help each of them achieve their goals, desires and aspirations. The objective should be to help one another and to accomplish this each of us must identify those things that motivate us both to work together.

Forbes has identified nine (9) things that ultimately motivate employees to achieve.

Trustworthy Leadership – Leaders that have your back and that are looking out for your best interests – will win the trust of their employees who in turn will be more motivated to achieve.

Being Relevant – In today’s world where everyone wants to be noticed and recognized for their work – employees are motivated to achieve to remain relevant.

Proving Others Wrong – This particular motivation to achieve has been heighten as of late from younger professionals that seek to prove themselves faster amongst older generations in the workplace.

Career Advancement – Perhaps the most important factor on this list is the ability to advance. Employees are extremely motivated to achieve if this means that advancement awaits them.

No Regrets – People don’t want to live with any regrets in their career/life and thus are motivated to not disappoint themselves.

Stable Future – People are motivated to have safety and security.

Self-Indulgence – This factor is quite interesting and extremely important to put into proper perspective. People are motivated for selfish reasons to achieve money, attention, fame, etc.

Impact – As mentioned earlier on, today’s employees are motivated to achieve more than ever simply by the opportunity to create impact.

Happiness – In the end, happiness is one of the greatest motivations to achieve. Happiness fuels ones self-esteem and gives people hope for a better tomorrow.

So, as leaders we are obligated to understand our employees motivational drivers and strive to provide the environment and opportunities that will allow them to be successful as well be the fuel driving successful organizations forward.

Integrity in Business 1

Change is the only constant these days..

In order to survive and prosper in today’s age any type of change – organizational, business or personal, some basic principles always come into play. These principles are forward thinking and emotionally mature and for those who value integrity above results, and people above profit.

It’s the future. Triple Bottom Line (Profit People Planet), Corporate Responsibility, Fair Trade, Sustainability, etc – these are not just fancy words – they are increasingly and ever more transparently becoming the criteria against which modern successful organizations are assessed – by customers, employees, and the world at large.

This is not to say that results and profit don’t matter, of course they do. The point is that when you value integrity and people, results and profit come quite naturally.

Rattan Tata, one of India’s most successful businessmen, decided early on not to succumb to the corruption that has been rampant in India for many decades. In order to succeed there, one has to bribe the way forward to succeed. He may not have succeeded as fast as he could have, but he stuck to his guns, and decided to follow his own path. Today, Tata is one of the largest companies in India.

What is the true nature of integrity? There are in fact some very basic principles that surround the qualities of business integrity. At its core, integrity begins with a company leader who understands the qualities of integrity which then filters down throughout the company into every department and every employye’s approach and attitude.
In recent research performed by the Institute of Business Ethics- an organization which is among the world’s leaders in promoting corporate ethical best practices, it was found that companies displaying a “clear commitment to ethical conduct” almost invariably outperform companies that do not display ethical conduct. The Director of the Institute of Business Ethics, Philippa Foster Black, stated: “Not only is ethical behavior in the business world the right and principled thing to do, but it has been proven that ethical behavior pays off in financial returns.” These findings deserve to be considered as an important tool for companies striving for long-term prospects and growth.

There are three “fruits” of integrity. The first is trust. Behaving with integrity builds trust among the people you are dealing with. Behaving without integrity builds distrust.

A second fruit of integrity is influence. Integrity creates reputation and sparks imitation; without it, you lack the ability to influence others and events. Influence is essential whether you want to be the leader of a successful organization.

The third fruit of integrity is repeat business. Whether you work in the services industry or manufacturing, acting with integrity almost always translates into more business from satisfied customers, their families, friends, co-workers, neighbors and on and on.

These behaviors are instilled in employees through leaders, and this inculcation requires diligence, persistence and ensuring that you ‘walk the walk and talk the talk’.

Inevitably, over time the culture of the company will attract and retain customers and profitability.